Brazilian Films Screening at the Cannes Festival

BOB SPIT
(Cesar Cabral)
Showcased at the first Cannes’ Animation Day, this NSFW claymation feature spins off a previous short film and the work of famed Brazilian cartoonist Angeli the Killer.

BRIEF STORY FROM THE GREEN PLANET
(Santiago Loza)
Three outsiders are tasked
with returning an alien to its planet. A low-fi road movie about friendship.

GHOST KILLER VS. BLOODY MARY
(Fabrício Bittar)
Backed by Warner Bros.
Brasil and Netflix, this $3 million horror-comedy follows a group of paranormal investigators on YouTube looking to explain the ghost terrorizing local school bathrooms.
Sales: Raven Banner

INDIANARA
(Aude Chevalier-Beaumel, Marcelo Barbosa)
In this polemical docu feature, Brazilian icon Indianara leads the fight against a repressive government to protect her country’s transgender population.

INVISIBLE LIFE
(Karim Aïnouz)
A banner Brazilian title from RT Features focuses on two sisters’ lives — denied access to a quality labor market, their voices challenged — from the 1950s to early 1970s. The film is framed by Aïnouz as classic melodrama in the vein of Douglas Sirk’s “Imitation of Life.”

ABE
(Fernando Grostein Andrade)
Abe, the 12-year-old son of an Israeli mother and Palestinian father, uses cooking to unite his family over a Thanksgiving meal.
Sales: Blue Fox Ent.

BACURAU
(Kleber Mendonça Filho, Juliano Dornelles)
Billed as a Brazilian Western and sci-fi adventure, Mendonça Filho’s film is a follow-up to lauded competition player “Aquarius.” “Highly political,” Thierry Fremaux said at his Cannes lineup announcement. A village in Brazil’s dirt-poor northeast outback discovers, after the death of its 94-year-old matriarch, that it no longer figures on any map.
Sales: SBS Films

BEFORE I FORGET
(Tiago Arakilian)
When a retired judge opens a strip club, he’s court-ordered to spend time with his son, who must judge the man’s mental state.
Sales: Maf Media.

MARIGHELLA
(Wagner Moura)
Saintly freedom fighter, or anti-dictatorship terrorist bogeyman? Rarely has a film divided Brazilians more, mostly before they’ve even seen it, than “Marighella,” the debut of “Narcos” actor-turned-director Moura, a propulsive action-thriller portrait of Carlos Marighella. One of the big Brazilian movies of the year.
Sales: Elle Driver

PORT AUTHORITY
(Danielle Lessovitz)
Visually grounded in a gritty realism akin to Darren Aronofsky’s “The Wrestler,” says director Lessovitz, this film is a star-crossed love affair between a Midwest teen and beautiful trans girl against the background of the Kiki Ball queer minority youth pageant.

ROJO
(Benjamín Naishtat)
The film which established Argentina’s Naishtat as a major international auteur to track, a “superb” third feature, said Variety, laying bare the “complacency and corruption of pre-coup Argentina in chilling, absurd style.” Sales: Luxbox

SICK, SICK, SICK
(Alice Furtado)
A portrait of an empowering and destructive high-school first love, with genre undertones. A highly anticipated first feature, playing in Directors’ Fortnight.

THE TRAITOR
(Marco Bellocchio)
A text-book co-production from Italy’s IBC and Kavak, Brazil’s Gullane, Germany’s Match Factory Prods. and France’s Ad Vitam, Bellocchio’s film is a portrait of a true game changer, Tommaso Buscetta, the first Cosa Nostra boss to break its vow of silence. In Cannes Competition.
Sales: The Match Factory.

Anna Marie de la Fuente and Jamie Lang contributed to this report.

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