Candice Bergen, Marshall Rose Ask $18 Million for Hamptons Estate

Hollywood mandarin Candice Bergen and Manhattan real estate magnate Marshall Rose have hung an $18 million price tag on their home in the Hamptons. Set on 1.8 carefully groomed acres along one of the most posh streets in über-swank East Hampton, the cedar-shingled cottage was designed by Jaque T. Robertson of Cooper Robertson Partners and built in the mid-1980s for Rose and his first wife, Jill, who passed away in 1996. Bergen, whose own first husband, celebrated French film director Louis Malle, passed away in 1995, became the lady of the house sometime around the time she and Rose were married in 2000.

The couple embarked on a comprehensive renovation in 2004 that was also spearheaded by Robertson, with the interiors done up, according to a 2007 feature in Architectural Digest, by Elissa Cullman of Cullman & Kravis. The goal was to keep the original spirit of the house but to give it a more casual, easy-going livability that reflected the personalities of both of its occupants. Listings held by Ed Petrie and Charles Forsman of Compass show that much of the fastidiously kept and eminently comfortable folk-art filled spaces remain all but untouched over the last dozen or so years.

Like most of homes in East Hampton, the Rose-Bergen estate hides behind a rigorously trimmed hedgerow and the dense canopies of mature specimen trees. There are a total of six bedrooms and six and a half bathrooms between the roughly 4,500-square-foot main house and detached guesthouse.

Light fills the not-particularly-formal living room of the main residence thanks to floor-to-ceiling windows, while the dining room, which does double duty as a library with a wall of bookshelves, flows into a second window-wrapped sitting room that spills out to the backyard. A gigantic pot rack hangs over a long work island in the kitchen — mind your noggins! — where wooden countertops are paired with commercial-style stainless steel appliances. The adjacent breakfast room’s walls of windows look out over the gardens.

A second floor lounge is a quietly sociable hub between several comfortably appointed guest bedrooms and the homeowner’s retreat. The spacious main suite, which features over-scaled plaid carpeting beneath a raised ceiling, also includes a dressing room with built-in dressers and a cottage-style marble-appointed bathroom sheathed in humble bead board.

At the back, the Dutch Grambrel roof overhangs a deep porch that runs the full width of the house and overlooks a football-field sized stretch of manicured lawn bordered by flowering gardens. Off to one side, a cupola tops the charming guesthouse that contains an airy open-plan living area. And, secreted behind the guesthouse amid dense gardens is a sun-dappled swimming pool.

Nominated for an Oscar for the 1979 romcom “Starting Over” and the winner of five Emmys for her titular role in the late 1980s and ‘90s sitcom “Murphy Brown,” and its short-lived 2018 reboot, Bergen and Rose also maintain a home in one of the most prestigious co-operative apartment houses along Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue, the same white glove building where Jackie Kennedy famously resided for 30 years before her 1994 death. Digital records suggest Rose has owned the generously terraced high-floor spread since at least the late 1970s and occupied it with his first wife before Bergen.

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