Frogmore House and Gardens set to open to the public

Take a peek inside the royal wedding venue: Frogmore House and its sumptuous gardens are set to open to the public just three WEEKS after Harry and Meghan’s big day

  • Frogmore House  will throw open its doors to the public for three days in June
  • Historic site has played host to British royals since George III’s reign in 1792 
  • Visitors can buy tickets as part of an annual open garden scheme, which will raise funds for National Garden Scheme, SSAFA and Prisoners’ Education Trust

Windsor residents may not be lucky enough to get a glimpse inside Harry and Meghan’s wedding venue on the big day – but all that will change on June 5th.

Frogmore House and its sumptuous gardens will throw open its doors to the public for three days this summer as part of an annual open garden scheme, it has been announced.

The stunning venue was the setting for Harry and Meghan’s official engagement shoot, and is where they will host VIP guests including the Queen after tying the knot at St. George’s Chapel on May 19.

Set within the grounds of Windsor Castle and built during the 17th century, Frogmore became a royal residence in 1792 when George III purchased it for his wife, Queen Charlotte.

Since then, successive monarchs have enjoyed the tranquil surroundings and delightful interiors. 

Wedding venue: Frogmore House and its sumptuous gardens will throw open its doors to the public for three days this summer, as part of an annual open garden scheme

Rich history: Set within the grounds of Windsor Castle and built in the 17th century, Frogmore House became a royal residence when George III purchased it for his wife, Queen Charlotte

Although it is no longer an occupied royal residence, Frogmore House is frequently used by the Royal family for private entertaining. 

The interior of Frogmore House is said to leave fascinating clues about the interests and talents of the generations of the royal family who have lived there over the years.

Queen Charlotte and her daughters’ passions for art and botany are reflected throughout the house, and works by the Duchess of Kent, who lived at Frogmore for almost 20 years, and those by her daughter Queen Victoria can be seen on display. 

The 35-acre gardens at Frogmore House are one of its most enduring attractions. First laid out for Queen Charlotte in the 1790s, they are based on a model ‘picturesque’ landscape. 

In 1867 Queen Victoria wrote, ‘this dear lovely garden…all is peace and quiet and you only hear the hum of the bees, the singing of the birds.’ 

Special place: The stunning venue was the setting for Harry and Meghan’s official engagement shoot (pictured), and is where they will host VIP guests including the Queen on May 19

Since the reign of George III, successive monarchs have enjoyed the tranquil surroundings and delightful interiors (pictured: the Queen and Prince Philip with their four children in 1965)

The Royal family in 1968. Although it is no longer an occupied royal residence, Frogmore House is frequently used by the Royal family for private entertaining

Steeped in history, the interior of Frogmore House is said to leave fascinating clues about the interests and talents of the generations of the royal family who have lived there over the years

Royal legacy: Queen Charlotte and her daughters’ passions for art and botany are reflected throughout the house, and works by the Duchess of Kent, who lived at Frogmore for almost 20 years, and those by her daughter Queen Victoria can be seen on display

The design and planting scheme today incorporates additions made during the reigns of Queen Victoria and Queen Mary, as well as a number of trees and shrubs added to mark the Queen’s Silver Jubilee in 1977.

Today, visitors can enjoy gentle garden walks and views of Queen Victoria’s Tea House, the white-marble Indian Kiosk, and the 18th-century lake. 

Heather Skinner, vice chairman and Berkshire County organiser of the National Garden Scheme, said: ‘We are grateful and excited that Frogmore House and Garden will open in aid of the National Garden Scheme to raise vital funds for the amazing nurses and caring charities we support, all of whom help people at times in their lives when they need it most. 

Stunning: The 35-acre gardens at Frogmore House are one of its most enduring attractions. First laid out for Queen Charlotte in the 1790s, they are based on a model ‘picturesque’ landscape

Gushing about the royal residence in 1867 Queen Victoria wrote, ‘this dear lovely garden…all is peace and quiet and you only hear the hum of the bees, the singing of the birds’

Major operation: The design and planting scheme today incorporates additions made during the reigns of Queen Victoria and Queen Mary, as well as a number of trees and shrubs added to mark the Queen’s Silver Jubilee in 1977

All for a good cause: The National Garden Scheme (NGS) raises money for nursing and caring charities by opening private gardens of quality and interest to the public

Grand day out: Today, visitors can enjoy gentle garden walks and views of Queen Victoria’s Tea House, the white-marble Indian Kiosk, and the 18th-century lake

‘A visit to the garden at Frogmore House is very special – it’s a rare opportunity to experience the natural beauty of this private parkland garden in a memorable historic setting, and is a real highlight in our calendar of garden openings.’ 

The Frogmore House and Garden charity garden open days are on 5, 6 and 7 June 2018 in aid of the National Garden Scheme, SSAFA and Prisoners’ Education Trust respectively.

To book tickets to visit the garden at Frogmore House on Tuesday, 5 June visit royalcollection.org.uk/visit/frogmorehouse

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