Gaudi’s La Sagrada Familia to be built with Lancashire quarried stone

Gaudi’s unfinished Barcelona masterpiece La Sagrada Familia is now being built with stone quarried in LANCASHIRE

  • Gothic-style Roman Catholic church is one of Spain’s architectural gems
  • Antoni Gaudi’s epic vision was left unrealised when he passed away 1926
  • Brinscall Quarry in Lancashire is supplying special stone to finish building

Gaudi’s unfinished masterpiece La Sagrada Familia is being built with stone from a Lancashire quarry.

The Gothic-style Roman Catholic church – one of Spain’s architectural gems – was barely a quarter complete when the iconic architect passed away in 1926.

Since then, the Spanish Civil War and a lack of private donations meant building progress slowed and Antoni Gaudi’s vision was left unrealised.

A worker at Brinscall Quarry in Chorley, Lancashire, which is supplying the special stone required to finish constructing the iconic La Sagrada Familia church in Barcelona

The Gothic-style Roman Catholic church – one of Spain’s architectural gems – was barely a quarter complete when the iconic architect passed away in 1926

Now it has emerged that Brinscall Quarry in Chorley, Lancashire, is supplying the material required to finish the ambitious project.

Owned by Armstrongs Group, the quarry is one of the few places which stock the special sandstone required by Barcelona builders.

Not only is it the exact colour to match the rest of the building, but it is also free of cracks which could weaken the structure of the precious building.

It will be used for the bell towers on the Nativity and Passion facades, according to the Armstrongs Group website.

The sandstone already used on this portion of the building came from Montjuic in Barcelona.

But quarries in the region closed many years ago and it became difficult to source.

Now the material is being shipped out in great quantities from Lancashire – bringing a touch of northern British workmanship to the Spanish city’s coveted church.

One of the facades of the church still under construction. Antoni Gaudi intended to build 18 towers in total, but ten are yet to be erected

The tumbling texture of the building is often likened to melting candles

La Sagrada Familia attracts almost three million visitors every year, making it the most popular monument in Spain.

When construction is complete, its central tower will be 558 feet tall and the church will seat up to 13,000 people.

Gaudi hoped to build 18 towers in total, but the six central towers are still under construction.

Their tumbling texture are often likened to melting candles. 

LA SAGRADA FAMILIA: THE TOWER OF TUMBLING WAX 

La Sagrada Familia is a Gothic-style Roman Catholic church which stands beside the Carrer de Mallorca street in the centre of Barcelona, Spain.

Building began in 1882 and iconic Catalan architect Antoni Gaudi took over the ambitious project in 1914.

He planned to build 18 towers in total: 12 shorter ones on the facades and six taller ones in the centre in a pyramidal layout.

Gaudi had designed the church so it would be able to seat up to 13,000 people. 

After his death in 1926, the project was left unfinished. But work continued to complete it, sticking to the vision he had.

It is often said that the texture of the towers gives the appearance of candles which are melting, with wax dripping down their sides. 

According to the church’s official website, 70 per cent of the work is now complete and the focus is on building the six central towers. 

The almighty project is scheduled to be completed in 2026 to coincide with the 100-year anniversary of the architect’s death.

Sources: Sagrada Familia
 

Source: Read Full Article